An adventure on the JOIDES Resolution: One year later

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Fig. 1 – (Top) One of the many magnificent sunrises observed by scientists on board the JR; (Bottom) View of the derrick, tower that holds the drill string, from the Bridge Deck, and (Top-left) all Expedition 360 participants. Images credits: William Crawford, Exp. 360 Senior Imaging Specialist; Jiansong Zhang, Exp. 360 Education/Outreach Officer.

Earlier this year Barbara wrote about ‘Life on board of a scientific drilling vessel’. That interview gave some hints in the unique experience my colleagues and I shared on board the Joides Resolution. Now, you might wonder what Joides Resolution (JR) exactly is. The JR is a drilling vessel dedicated to scientific research on ocean and ocean crust dynamics. Different disciplines are involved, from geology (to elucidate the formation of the oceanic crust), to climate change science (to understand how the Earth handled past climatic events), oceanography (to study global water circulation), or microbiology (to track extreme life in rocks forming the ocean floor).Cores of rocks are drilled under the ocean floor, giving scientists a glimpse into Earth’s dynamics. The JR works for the international research program IODP (International Ocean Discovery Program), a marine research collaboration that aims at recovering data recorded in seafloor sediments and rocks, and monitoring subseafloor environments. Continue reading

Breaking rocks: a closer look

When I described in my last post how rocks can be broken up by volume-increasing reactions happening within them, I left you with several open questions in the end. One of them was whether reaction-driven fracturing can also occur when there is no stress from the outside and no fracture to start with. It is easy enough to imagine that minerals that grow in a crack may push against the walls of the crack, move them apart and cause further fracturing. But for this first crack, with which everything starts, we certainly need some forces from the outside that make the rock break. Or do we really?

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Breaking rocks from the inside

Did you ever forget a beverage bottle in the freezer? If not, you can be both glad and sad now: Glad, because you did not have to clean up the resulting mess (which can be quite substantial, especially if it was not just water that you forgot in the freezer). Sad, because you have missed a great opportunity to observe reaction-driven fracturing in your own kitchen. However, some people experienced it and even took pictures (figure 1):

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Fig. 1: The volume increase during the phase transition from water to ice (from left to right) caused fracturing of a bottle of Julebrus, Norwegian “Christmas Soda”.

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